Club News

IRB to implement 12 month trial of ELV’s from August 1st 2008

June 24th, 2008

From the 1st August 2008, the IRB will be implementing a 12 month global trial of 13 Experimental Law Variations (ELVs).  All ELV’s will be implemented by the IRFU in Professional and all Domestic competition.  However, a decision on the IRFU’s implementation of ELV 17 (‘Pulling down the maul’) at Age Grade level will be made in early July 2008.

ELV’s are listed below, under the headings of the Law they are a variation of, with their interpretation.

A guide to the full list of ELV’s can be downloaded here.

LAW 6 – MATCH OFFICIALS
ELV No.1 – Assistant Referees are able to assist the referee in any way that the referee requires
What this means for the Game

When appointed by a match organiser, e.g. a Rugby Union, SANZAR, ERC, etc., qualified touch judges will be known as assistant referees and can, at the discretion of the referee, be assigned additional responsibilities. This Experimental Law Variation is designed to allow assistant referees to provide additional information to the referee to assist in decision making.

LAW 17 – MAUL
ELV No.2 – In Maul remove reference to head and shoulders not being lower than hips
What this means for the Game

Failure of players to keep their heads and shoulders above their hips throughout the maul will no longer constitute an offence.
ELV No.3 – Players are able to defend a maul by pulling it down
What this means for the Game
A defending team may pull the maul to the ground. To do this, the defender must grasp an opposing player in the maul anywhere between the shoulders and the hips and then pull that player to the ground. If the maul is brought down by any other action it is regarded as a collapse which remains illegal.

LAW 19 – TOUCH & LINEOUT
ELV No.4 – If a team puts ball back into its own 22 and the ball is subsequently kicked directly into touch, there is no gain in ground
What this means for the Game
Teams will no longer be able to pass or play the ball back into their own 22 and then kick directly to touch in order to gain ground. This Experimental Law Variation is designed to ensure that defending teams do not have an unfair advantage over attacking teams. It encourages tactical kicking and counter-attacking skills.
ELV No.5 – A quick throw in may be thrown in straight or towards the throwing team’s own goal line
What this means for the Game

When taking a quick throw in, a player will no longer be required to throw the ball straight along the line of touch. If an advantage can be gained by throwing the ball directly to a team-mate who is behind the line of touch, this will be legal. The ball must still travel 5 metres before it touches the ground or another player. This Experimental Law Variation is designed to increase the likelihood of a quick throw in providing a positive opportunity for the team taking the throw in to run the ball rather than opting for the lineout.
ELV Nr.6 – There is no restriction on the number of players from either team who can participate in the lineout
What this means for the Game

At a lineout the team who is not throwing in the ball will no longer have their number of lineout players governed by the number of lineout players chosen by the team throwing in the ball. As long as there are at least two players from each team to form a lineout, and all lineout players fit between the 5-metre and 15-metre lines, there is no further restriction on numbers. This Experimental Law Variation is designed to allow teams more flexibility in their tactics at the lineout.
ELV No. 7 – The receiver at the lineout must be 2 metres away from the lineout
ELV No. 8 – The player who is in opposition to the player throwing in the ball must stand in the area between the 5-metre line and the touchline but must be 2 metres away from the 5-metre line
What this means for the Game

If a team chooses to have a receiver (a player in position to catch the ball when lineout players pass or knock the ball back from the lineout) that player must be 2 metres away from the lineout itself.
Similarly, the defending team must have a player in immediate opposition to the player throwing in and that player must stay 2 metres away from the 5 metre line.
These Experimental Law Variations are designed to assist the referee in providing a clear 2 metre zone around the lineout. The referee will be able to clearly identify which player is the receiver and will be able to clearly see that the player immediately opposing the thrower is not a lineout player.
ELV Nr. 9 – Lineout players may pre-grip a jumper before the ball is thrown in
What this means for the Game

Players will no longer be required to wait until the player throwing in has released the ball before they grip a player who will jump to catch the ball.
ELV Nr.10 – The lifting of lineout players is permitted
What this means for the Game

Players will be able to lift team-mates in the lineout. However, support players must wait until the ball has left the hands of the player throwing it in before lifting their team-mate.

LAW 20 – SCRUM
ELV No.11 – Introduction of an offside line 5 metres behind the hindmost feet of the scrum
What this means for the Game
At the scrum, both back lines (all non-participants in the scrum) must be back 5 metres from the hindmost feet of the scrum. This Experimental Law Variation is designed to increase the space available to the team who wins the ball at the scrum. By having all the forwards committed at the scrum itself and 10 metres between the backlines, significant space is created in which to build an attack.
ELV No. 12 – Identification of scrum-half offside lines
What this means for the Game
As a result of the introduction of the 5 metre offside line at the scrum, there is a need to establish the offside lines which apply to a scrum half.

LAW 22 – CORNER POSTS
ELV Nr. 13 – The Corner posts are no longer considered to be touch-in-goal except when the ball is grounded against the post.
What this means for the Game
A try will no longer be disallowed if the ball carrier touches the corner post before grounding the ball as long as that player has not otherwise been in touch. A try will still be disallowed if the ball is grounded against the corner post. If the ball hits the corner post and bounces back into the playing area, the game continues. This Experimental Law Variation is designed to avoidtries being disallowed simply because a player has taken out the corner post. It will also serve to simplify the role of the Television Match Official who will no longer need to discern whether the player made contact with the corner post before grounding the ball.

Photo’s from Connemara RFC Beach TAG 21st June 2008

June 22nd, 2008

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Beach Tag 2008 Beach Tag 2008 Beach Tag 2008 

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Beach Tag 2008

Photo’s from Golf Am-Am 25-5-08

June 22nd, 2008

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